A digest of online China – April 1 – April 30

This column offers a short digest of the latest pieces published on our website. 

New texts published

children

On hearing only powerful voices – Zhang Ming

On the basis of a pollution case in Inner Mongolia, Zhang Ming calls for a reflection on the voices that get heard, and those that remain ignore – and how to curb abuse of power from officials who refuse to listen.

Encounter stories at the dinner table – Zhao Jianfei

Small anecdotes can reveal the spirit of the times. Blogger Zhao Jianfei jots down two conversations overheard, revealing aspects of economic and romantic success in today’s China.

Protocols for the dignity of legal officials – He Weifang

Legal procedures have historically been connected to complex rituals and protocols. Law expert He Weifang reflects on the reasons for the rites surrounding the exercise of justice, and the necessity to create conditions that guarantee of officials in charge of determining justice.

Immortality – Li Yinhe

This short meditation by sociologist Li Yinhe questions our quest for immortality and aspirations to historical grandeur. Is this the path to happiness?

Love and revolution (10) – Ye Fu

A new stage in Ye Fu’s family story and memories of the second world war – now taking us to Chongqing, and remembering the ongoing role of education during these troubled times.

Reasons to read books – Yu Ge

Remembering the day he returned his library card after graduating is a starting point for Yu Ge’s meditation on the art of reading. Reading does not have a clear purpose – it will not change the face of China – yet should we stop that activity altogether, just because it has no direct utilitarian purpose? What if reading was one of the key elements for spiritual freedom?

Can princesses have abortions? – Ka Hu

Is it wrong for a primary school girl to write a princess abortion into her fairy tale narrative? This happened in a Chinese primary school, and the teacher not only marked harshly, but published the student’s essay on weibo for public mockery. Freelance writer Ka Hu reflects on this story – inviting a more measured and respectful way of considering a child’s way of integrating the complexities of the contemporary adult world.

Jinan – Wei Zhou

Shanghai-based travel writer Wei Zhou returns to the Shandong capital after fifteen years, observing the many changes that occurred: long stretches of new suburbs, refurbished plaza. The text then turns on to a quest for the sources and memories of this non-touristic city, and the essence of Shandong culture.

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